White Fragility: A Study in Irrelevance

By Phil Bair

White Fragility, Robin DiAngelo’s 2018 volume subtitled, “Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism,” has become the anti-racist Bible for a large reader bloc, and for good reason. DiAngelo is both witty and articulate. Her basic ideological arc is that all white people are racist, whether they want to be or … Continue reading White Fragility: A Study in Irrelevance

The Appeal & the Problems of Critical Theory

By John White

Critical Theory ideology is quite prevalent in the modern culture today. From this theory we get the term, “social justice.” Social justice touches upon many of the most volatile issues in our society. Unfortunately, this term is not clearly defined, and many people do not know how to clearly understand Critical Theory and its resultant … Continue reading The Appeal & the Problems of Critical Theory

Biblical Christianity VS Critical (Race) Theory

By Phillip Mast (of Theist Thug Life)

Church, we’ve got a problem: Critical Theory (sometimes referred to as Critical Race Theory). This worldview is a growing problem finding its way into the Church. Too many professing Christians today are, willingly or unwillingly, buying into this idea known to have Marxist origins. It’s an attempt to explain and confront power structures in the … Continue reading Biblical Christianity VS Critical (Race) Theory

A Thinking Person’s Guide to Opposing Racism

By Timothy Hsiao

Today’s anti-racism crusaders have a lot more in common with Malcolm X than Martin Luther King, Jr. They have become so zealous in opposing racism that they see racism in everything—even breakfast cereal. Instead of condemning actual racism, the charge of racism is now used to compel allegiance and silence dissent. No one wants to … Continue reading A Thinking Person’s Guide to Opposing Racism

PSYCHONIX: Mind Over Matter (Book Review)

By Suzanne Stratton

PSYCHONIX: Mind Over Matter, by Mike Burnette, is a blend of interesting, well-developed characters, and exciting, intriguing action. It is a many layered novel, with unexpected twists and turns. If you like science fiction, espionage, psychology, war stories, philosophy, and many other topics, you will find plenty to attract and keep your attention. Readers with … Continue reading PSYCHONIX: Mind Over Matter (Book Review)

Jesus Endorsed Armed Self-Defense

By Timothy Hsiao

Is it morally permissible for faithful Christians to carry firearms? Yes. But don’t take my word for it: Jesus himself instructed his disciples to arm themselves with swords for self-defense. Sell Your Cloak and Buy a Sword In Luke 22, Jesus addresses his disciples shortly before his arrest, trial, and eventual crucifixion. He reminds them … Continue reading Jesus Endorsed Armed Self-Defense

Book Review: How Reason Can Lead To God by Joshua Rasmussen

By Stelman Smith Jr.

“I write for a specific sort of person. You value reason, science, and independent thinking. You question beliefs propped up by ‘faith’ without sufficient evidence. Maybe you would like your life to have a deeper purpose, but you cannot believe something based on a mere wish. Whether you are a student, an academic, or just … Continue reading Book Review: How Reason Can Lead To God by Joshua Rasmussen

A Student’s Guide to Culture: A Review

By Richard Eng

In a culture that is increasingly post-Christian, the church needs helpful resources to use in order to better equip the next generation to engage the culture. John Stonestreet and Brett Kunkle’s A Student’s Guide to Culture does just that. This book is meant to be a companion to A Practical Guide to Culture, a book … Continue reading A Student’s Guide to Culture: A Review

Sean Carroll, Joe Rogan, and a Volleyball Called “Wilson.”

By Braxton Hunter

Whether one embraces Christian theism or not, it should be somewhat uncontroversial that a Christian worldview supplies satisfying answers to humanity’s deepest questions and longings. Is man determined by external forces, or may he chart his own path? Should he be held responsible, and to what extent? Does the complexity of nature hint at design, … Continue reading Sean Carroll, Joe Rogan, and a Volleyball Called “Wilson.”

The COVID-19 War

By Dr. Dan Eichenberger

The United States incurred an unprovoked attack, and the enemy (COVID-19) has inflicted casualties. The President declared war and already invoked the Defense Production Act, essentially forcing private companies into production of what the government demands. Since war has been declared, the expectation is there will be casualties, both of those on the front lines … Continue reading The COVID-19 War

Secularism, COVID-19, & the “Non-Essential” Church

By Rich Hoyer

Many have asked the question, “Why are churches considered ‘non-essential’ during the Coronovirus shutdown and places like restaurants considered ‘essential’? Why are churches closed while grocery stores and restaurants remain open (at least for carry-out orders)?” The insinuation is NOT that food isn’t necessary; but the focus of the inquiry is on why churches are … Continue reading Secularism, COVID-19, & the “Non-Essential” Church

Sean Carroll’s Dishonesty: The Debate of 2014

By Ronald Cram

Philosophy of science is a fascinating and complex field. The job requires one to philosophize about well-established scientific observations, patterns, theorems, theories, models, laws of nature, and more. A good philosopher of science will also philosophize about the standards of science and the standards of communicating science. And a brave philosopher of science will even … Continue reading Sean Carroll’s Dishonesty: The Debate of 2014

Behind the Song “The Cross Is” by Mikel Del Rosario

By Mikel Del Rosario

Why did you write the song? As a doctoral student who’s also a musician, I need a creative outlet that gets my hands back on a guitar to create something.  When I get a chance to steal away from my studies, I still like to play guitar and work on music. I attended a songwriter’s … Continue reading Behind the Song “The Cross Is” by Mikel Del Rosario

An Investigator Examines the Resurrection

By Ross Hickling

Note from Tim Stratton: I first met Ross Hickling when we arrived for summer residency at Biola University. This US Marshall and I were both enrolled in the MACA program and were assigned as roommates. We also both went on to attain doctoral degrees from North-West University. This article was originally published on the Ratio … Continue reading An Investigator Examines the Resurrection

The Redefinition of Love—Resulting From the Loss of Truth

By Rich Hoyer

Most people agree that we should love one another. But what does it mean to love others? Love can’t mean what our culture says it means.  It can’t be untethered from a transcendent moral standard (i.e. God’s word and natural law) and left to be defined subjectively by our feelings, to be molded and fashioned … Continue reading The Redefinition of Love—Resulting From the Loss of Truth

A Logical Argument on Evil

By Dan Eichenberger

The problem of evil is one of the most common arguments used by non-believers, atheists, agnostics, and seekers when trying to develop an intellectual argument against God. Trying to reconcile the cognitive dissonance of acknowledging evil while accepting the reality of an all-powerful (Omnipotent), all-knowing (Omniscient), and always present (Omnipresent) supreme being is seemingly untenable. … Continue reading A Logical Argument on Evil