Jesus Endorsed Armed Self-Defense

By Timothy Hsiao

Is it morally permissible for faithful Christians to carry firearms? Yes. But don’t take my word for it: Jesus himself instructed his disciples to arm themselves with swords for self-defense. Sell Your Cloak and Buy a Sword In Luke 22, Jesus addresses his disciples shortly before his arrest, trial, and eventual crucifixion. He reminds them … Continue reading Jesus Endorsed Armed Self-Defense

Book Review: How Reason Can Lead To God by Joshua Rasmussen

By Stelman Smith Jr.

“I write for a specific sort of person. You value reason, science, and independent thinking. You question beliefs propped up by ‘faith’ without sufficient evidence. Maybe you would like your life to have a deeper purpose, but you cannot believe something based on a mere wish. Whether you are a student, an academic, or just … Continue reading Book Review: How Reason Can Lead To God by Joshua Rasmussen

A Student’s Guide to Culture: A Review

By Richard Eng

In a culture that is increasingly post-Christian, the church needs helpful resources to use in order to better equip the next generation to engage the culture. John Stonestreet and Brett Kunkle’s A Student’s Guide to Culture does just that. This book is meant to be a companion to A Practical Guide to Culture, a book … Continue reading A Student’s Guide to Culture: A Review

Sean Carroll, Joe Rogan, and a Volleyball Called “Wilson.”

By Braxton Hunter

Whether one embraces Christian theism or not, it should be somewhat uncontroversial that a Christian worldview supplies satisfying answers to humanity’s deepest questions and longings. Is man determined by external forces, or may he chart his own path? Should he be held responsible, and to what extent? Does the complexity of nature hint at design, … Continue reading Sean Carroll, Joe Rogan, and a Volleyball Called “Wilson.”

The COVID-19 War

By Dr. Dan Eichenberger

The United States incurred an unprovoked attack, and the enemy (COVID-19) has inflicted casualties. The President declared war and already invoked the Defense Production Act, essentially forcing private companies into production of what the government demands. Since war has been declared, the expectation is there will be casualties, both of those on the front lines … Continue reading The COVID-19 War

Secularism, COVID-19, & the “Non-Essential” Church

By Rich Hoyer

Many have asked the question, “Why are churches considered ‘non-essential’ during the Coronovirus shutdown and places like restaurants considered ‘essential’? Why are churches closed while grocery stores and restaurants remain open (at least for carry-out orders)?” The insinuation is NOT that food isn’t necessary; but the focus of the inquiry is on why churches are … Continue reading Secularism, COVID-19, & the “Non-Essential” Church

Sean Carroll’s Dishonesty: The Debate of 2014

By Ronald Cram

Philosophy of science is a fascinating and complex field. The job requires one to philosophize about well-established scientific observations, patterns, theorems, theories, models, laws of nature, and more. A good philosopher of science will also philosophize about the standards of science and the standards of communicating science. And a brave philosopher of science will even … Continue reading Sean Carroll’s Dishonesty: The Debate of 2014

Behind the Song “The Cross Is” by Mikel Del Rosario

By Mikel Del Rosario

Why did you write the song? As a doctoral student who’s also a musician, I need a creative outlet that gets my hands back on a guitar to create something.  When I get a chance to steal away from my studies, I still like to play guitar and work on music. I attended a songwriter’s … Continue reading Behind the Song “The Cross Is” by Mikel Del Rosario

An Investigator Examines the Resurrection

By Ross Hickling

Note from Tim Stratton: I first met Ross Hickling when we arrived for summer residency at Biola University. This US Marshall and I were both enrolled in the MACA program and were assigned as roommates. We also both went on to attain doctoral degrees from North-West University. This article was originally published on the Ratio … Continue reading An Investigator Examines the Resurrection

The Redefinition of Love—Resulting From the Loss of Truth

By Rich Hoyer

Most people agree that we should love one another. But what does it mean to love others? Love can’t mean what our culture says it means.  It can’t be untethered from a transcendent moral standard (i.e. God’s word and natural law) and left to be defined subjectively by our feelings, to be molded and fashioned … Continue reading The Redefinition of Love—Resulting From the Loss of Truth

A Logical Argument on Evil

By Dan Eichenberger

The problem of evil is one of the most common arguments used by non-believers, atheists, agnostics, and seekers when trying to develop an intellectual argument against God. Trying to reconcile the cognitive dissonance of acknowledging evil while accepting the reality of an all-powerful (Omnipotent), all-knowing (Omniscient), and always present (Omnipresent) supreme being is seemingly untenable. … Continue reading A Logical Argument on Evil

A Response to Richard Carrier

By Joshua Pelletier

On October 25th, 2019, Richard Carrier, published a blog titled, Mark’s Use of Paul’s Epistles.[1] Carrier’s main argument is that Mark used Paul and that Matthew and Luke used Mark.  Specifically, Mark transvalued what Paul had written into his own stories.  This is problematic for Carrier, because he believes “Paul clearly taught that all his … Continue reading A Response to Richard Carrier

A Rational Presuppositional Approach to Free Will

By Kelly Fitzsimmons Burton

I met Tim Stratton when he reached out to me after reading my book Reason and Proper Function: A Response to Alvin Plantinga. He enthusiastically let me know that the argument I presented in that book supports a version of libertarian freedom that he endorses. At first, I wondered “what did I write to support … Continue reading A Rational Presuppositional Approach to Free Will

Arguing Over the Holidays at Calvin’s Place

By Dave Oldham

Family times over Christmas and New Year’s can spawn interesting conversations and sometimes heated “discussions.” This was true at the Johann Calvin home, where his daughter Connie and son-in-law Erasmus had gathered to celebrate the holidays. Erasmus had received his Ph.D. in philosophy from UA (the University of Arminia), and his view of human freedom … Continue reading Arguing Over the Holidays at Calvin’s Place

Are Pro-Lifers Who Own Guns Hypocrites?

By Nathan Apodaca

Another assertion has become commonplace in discussions of abortion. Pro-lifers who own firearms, or support military actions abroad are misled at best, and at worst, hypocrites. The critic assumes that any inconsistently held pro-life beliefs are evidence pro-lifers aren’t actually motivated by a desire to protect human life, but rather a desire to control women’s … Continue reading Are Pro-Lifers Who Own Guns Hypocrites?

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

The Rise of Skywalker & the Failure of Relativism

By Nathan Apodaca

Spoilers to follow (you’ve been warned)! The 40+ year Star Wars franchise has finally drawn the story of the powerful Skywalker family to a close. Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker served a powerful end to the story first started with A New Hope in 1977. As a lifelong Star Wars fan, I … Continue reading The Rise of Skywalker & the Failure of Relativism

1 2 3 10