Rocks in Socks: The Art of Asking Clever Questions

Since publishing Human Freedom, Divine Knowledge, and Mere Molinism in October of 2020, almost every day I have dialoged with determinists. They are either theological determinists (typically Calvinists) who are seemingly committed to exhaustive divine determinism (EDD) or they are scientific determinists (typically naturalists/atheists) who believe that all things about humanity are ultimately causally determined … Continue reading Rocks in Socks: The Art of Asking Clever Questions

A Mad Scientist and a Pop Quiz: A Case for Freedom

Suppose a mad scientist while you were sleeping gained access to your brain, implanted special microchips, and now has the ability and opportunity to exhaustively control (causally determine) all of your thoughts and beliefs all the time. Although you are unaware, the mad scientist now has control over exactly what you think of and about … Continue reading A Mad Scientist and a Pop Quiz: A Case for Freedom

God is NOT a Deity of Deception

Question Dr. Tim, You recently shared a Facebook post high-lightning the Apostle Paul’s words in 1st Corinthians 10:15. It reads: “I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say.” You then added the following: “Be a FreeThinker. Don’t let something or someone else causally determine your judgments!” Do you really want to … Continue reading God is NOT a Deity of Deception

Assurance of Salvation

Recently I had an enlightening conversation with EDD (an exhaustive divine determinist). Calvinists who affirm exhaustive divine determinism believe that God causally determines all things all the time (unless they are discussing 1 Timothy 2:4, these Calvinists do affirm that “all” means “all”). This means that everything about a human — every thought, belief, action, … Continue reading Assurance of Salvation

Defining Libertarian Freedom

Question Hey Dr. Stratton, A fellow libertarian has taken issue with your definition of libertarian freedom. Although you offer multiple definitions in your book and other writings, you often describe libertarian freedom in the following manner: “the ability to choose among a range of alternative options, each of which is compatible with one’s nature at … Continue reading Defining Libertarian Freedom

Droids in Heaven?

Question: Hey Dr. Stratton, In a FB group, Tyler Vela (a well-known internet Calvinist) posted the following question: “Libertarians – will we be robots in the eternal state since we will not be able to sin? (Note: if you make a nature or “we won’t want to” argument then you’re just making the same nature/ultimate … Continue reading Droids in Heaven?

Missing Melanchthon

Recently I have been accused of “historical eisegesis.”[1] According to Wikipedia, “eisegesis is the process of interpreting text in such a way as to introduce one’s own presuppositions . . . It is commonly referred to as reading into the text.” This is definitely a problem when someone does this when reading Scripture, but it’s … Continue reading Missing Melanchthon

Book Review: Human Freedom, Divine Knowledge, and Mere Molinism by Timothy Stratton

How does God’s knowledge relate to the created world? And if God knows the future, what does that mean for human freedom? In Human Freedom, Divine Knowledge, and Mere Molinism Tim Stratton seeks to shed light on these questions by engaging with the apparent conflict between human freedom and divine knowledge. The bulk of the book is … Continue reading Book Review: Human Freedom, Divine Knowledge, and Mere Molinism by Timothy Stratton

The Location of Determinism

Question: Dr. Tim, The location of determinism, if external, could be seen as warrant to the conclusion that we are “meat puppets”. But why must we accept that determinism is solely through external “forces” beyond our control? First, this assumes control *must* be regulative. But more importantly, why can the location of determinism not be … Continue reading The Location of Determinism

Bignon’s Review of Mere Molinism: A Rejoinder

My recently published book, Human Freedom, Divine Knowledge, and Mere Molinism, has, for the most part, received positive reviews. But I had anticipated a negative response from one particular philosopher, Guillaume Bignon, a Calvinist, whom I critiqued in the book. Bignon provided a 50-page “extremely negative assessment” criticizing almost everything in the book — from my … Continue reading Bignon’s Review of Mere Molinism: A Rejoinder