Philosophical Notes on the Underground: Two

I closed Note One by calling Underground Man “grouchy.”[1] That is an understatement. The man admits to being spiteful. He hates his neighbors, practices cruelty, and delights in the misfortune of others. He even claims to take pleasure in his own pain and bitterness, some of which is self-induced. For example: “I reached a point … Continue reading Philosophical Notes on the Underground: Two

Philosophical Notes on the Underground: One

“Meaningless! Meaningless!” says the Teacher. “Utterly meaningless! Everything is meaningless.” (Ecclesiastes 1:2)   In Part 1 of Notes from Underground, Dostoyevsky’s Underground Man claims that consciousness is a disease.[1] In a loose sense, given certain assumptions, Underground Man makes a significant point. In a strict sense, however, he is wrong. Let me explain. First, we … Continue reading Philosophical Notes on the Underground: One

Friends talking

Talking About SIN with Truth & Love

Question: Dear Tim, How do you lovingly tell your unsaved friends about their sin (especially their sinful sexual behavior)? Is it better just to spread Christ’s love, and hope they come to desire it as well? What if our friends don’t believe in God? – From a concerned teenager Tim’s Response: This is basically a … Continue reading Talking About SIN with Truth & Love

“The Ring of Truth”

What religion or worldview possesses the “Ring of Truth?” It is definitely not Islam or atheism! To be sure, this is not a deductive argument like the Kalam, Freethinking, or Ontological Arguments. I am simply encouraging readers to pay attention to their intuition. Although we cannot always trust our intuition, I contend that it is … Continue reading “The Ring of Truth”

A “God Problem” in The New York Times

Recently, Peter Atterton, a professor of philosophy at San Diego State University, published an article in The New York Times entitled “A God Problem: Perfect. All-powerful. All-knowing. The idea of the deity most Westerners accept is actually not coherent.” Given the title, I was excited to read what this philosopher was sharing with the masses since … Continue reading A “God Problem” in The New York Times

Debating Determinism with Dillahunty

“Would you be interested in debating Matt Dillahunty?” That was the question I received in July of 2018, from one of the organizers for the Texas Baptist Unapologetics Conference. “Hmm . . . I don’t know,” was all I could say. I’d seen the scathing videos from Matt’s show, The Atheist Experience, and was aware … Continue reading Debating Determinism with Dillahunty

Lowder’s Comments to My Assessment of His Debate with Turek

In 2016, Jeffery Jay Lowder1 debated Frank Turek on the topic Naturalism vs theism (see https://youtu.be/ENZYEPpR2Jc). In early 2017, I wrote two articles in which I assess Lowder’s opening statement (see here and here). It was brought to my attention that Lowder recently made some comments to my assessment (see the comment section here). I … Continue reading Lowder’s Comments to My Assessment of His Debate with Turek

Captain America & the Moral Argument

The Marvel Movie franchise is arguably the most epic enterprise in movie history. The series has a number of stand-out characters, however, two stand out more than the others. In fact, their differences stand in such firm relief so as to culminate in a film where they were driven toe-to-toe whilst still harboring a slight underlying … Continue reading Captain America & the Moral Argument

Deconstructing the Generic Hiddenness Argument

“deus absconditus” (the hidden God) – Thomas Aquinas Having stumbled across the doctrine of Hell, Atheist Smith frets over the seemingly harsh punishments promised to the unbelievers within Christianity. Deep within, he wants to submit to the “fairy-tale” that billions of people believe in the world. Yet, he just can’t wrap his head around one … Continue reading Deconstructing the Generic Hiddenness Argument

Objective Beauty & the Existence of God

Recall the most beautiful landscape you have ever witnessed. Think about how you felt a need to take an extra moment (or several) to stare at the scene as to sear it into your memory — almost as if it were the right thing to do. Does it not seem wrong to ignore such magnificence? … Continue reading Objective Beauty & the Existence of God