PSYCHONIX: Mind Over Matter (Book Review)

PSYCHONIX: Mind Over Matter, by Mike Burnette, is a blend of interesting, well-developed characters, and exciting, intriguing action. It is a many layered novel, with unexpected twists and turns. If you like science fiction, espionage, psychology, war stories, philosophy, and many other topics, you will find plenty to attract and keep your attention. Readers with … Continue reading PSYCHONIX: Mind Over Matter (Book Review)

A Student’s Guide to Culture: A Review

In a culture that is increasingly post-Christian, the church needs helpful resources to use in order to better equip the next generation to engage the culture. John Stonestreet and Brett Kunkle’s A Student’s Guide to Culture does just that. This book is meant to be a companion to A Practical Guide to Culture, a book … Continue reading A Student’s Guide to Culture: A Review

Sean Carroll, Joe Rogan, and a Volleyball Called “Wilson.”

Whether one embraces Christian theism or not, it should be somewhat uncontroversial that a Christian worldview supplies satisfying answers to humanity’s deepest questions and longings. Is man determined by external forces, or may he chart his own path? Should he be held responsible, and to what extent? Does the complexity of nature hint at design, … Continue reading Sean Carroll, Joe Rogan, and a Volleyball Called “Wilson.”

The Freethinking Argument VS a Presuppositional Apologist

When debating the FreeThinking Argument with naturalists (those who presuppose nature is all that exists), they often accuse me of being a “presuppositionalist” (a.k.a., “a presupper”)! This means that they incorrectly believe that I am assuming naturalism is false to conclude the supernatural exists. If this were the case, I would be committing a textbook example … Continue reading The Freethinking Argument VS a Presuppositional Apologist

How the Soul Makes Freedom Possible

Objection: Dear Tim, What exactly is a soul and by what exact mechanism does it make libertarian free will possible where it is otherwise impossible? If one person has a soul and another person doesn’t, how does the soul lead to better or more informed decisions in the first person? If their brains are otherwise … Continue reading How the Soul Makes Freedom Possible

Computers Don’t Know Jack!

Question: Dear Tim, Why does one have to ‘freely’ infer [knowledge claims]? Do computers require free will to make accurate calculations? Evidently not – they seem to get by just fine! Imagine giving two computers sentience. They argue between them over a particular course of action and which option is the best. What’s wrong with … Continue reading Computers Don’t Know Jack!

Thinking about Sickness and Death

Death is the destiny of everyone; the living should take this to heart. (Ecclesiastes 7:2, NIV) Over the last few weeks, I have made some interesting sociocultural observations. For example, a local grocery store has limited the number of sanitizing wipes available for its customers and has offered to disinfect shopping carts for shoppers entering … Continue reading Thinking about Sickness and Death

Thinking About Free Thinking

Question: Dear Tim, This is a three-pronged question: What is The FreeThinking Argument? What are the premises of the argument? And what reasons are there to believe that the premises are true? Please lay out a defense of all of the argument’s steps. – Evan Tim’s Response: Thank you for the question, Evan.[1] Before I … Continue reading Thinking About Free Thinking

Philosophical Notes on the Underground: Three

“More than that: you say that then science itself will teach man (though this, to my mind, is already a luxury) that he really does not possess, and never did possess, either a will or a whim of his own; that he is, in fact, no more than a kind of piano key or organ … Continue reading Philosophical Notes on the Underground: Three

Philosophical Notes on the Underground: Two

I closed Note One by calling Underground Man “grouchy.”[1] That is an understatement. The man admits to being spiteful. He hates his neighbors, practices cruelty, and delights in the misfortune of others. He even claims to take pleasure in his own pain and bitterness, some of which is self-induced. For example: “I reached a point … Continue reading Philosophical Notes on the Underground: Two